Tag Archives: Reading

Developmental sequence in learning to read words

Method for learning and education.

Image via Wikipedia

There are 4 levels that children progress through when learning to read words:

1. Linking spoken and written words – this is when children start to make the links between what they hear and what they see by  memorising certain parts of words, convert letters into a sound then a blend ie ‘sh’ or use the first part of the word together with meaning.

2. Recognising letter-groups and words – at this stage, children are beginning to learn how to actually recode a letter cluster as a sound pattern. This is when THRASS is a useful tool for students to use when working with words.

3. Reading words directly – Children at this stage are now reading words using their phonemic and orthographic knowledge. This is when they start to make analogies with words that they know. For example, if the unknown word is ‘lay’ they may remember the word ‘d + ay = day’ and use this word to help them problem solve the unknown word.

4. Reading words of two or more syllables – at this stage, children are now combining segments of words, manipulating stress patterns in words and recognising smaller words within words and base words.

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Irlen Syndrome and Dyslexia- a mother’s reflection

Dyslexic vision

Image via Wikipedia

*Posted by Deborah <http://www.myschool.com.au/profile/Deborah659> on September 14, 2010 at on myschool.com.au.

My son has struggled and repeated one year since he started school.  I was one of those parents, and some teachers as well, that kept saying “try harder, don’t be so lazy.”  His learning support teacher would not give up and part of me would not believe (or face) that maybe he was dyslexic.  He just didn’t fit the symptoms.  After some research, I came across the Irlen Diagnostic web site.  He fitted their checklist to a T. Long story short; some believe and some say it is BS; he was tested and it turned out that with coloured lenses and overlays he was able to read without difficulty; he has improved dramatically in school.  I will never forget the joy on his face when he first clearly read out a difficult passage without hesitation.  So don’t write your kids off; this is more common than you think.

How to teach my child to learn to read and write

We know that early childhood is important and what we do is critical in order for us to provide the best possible environment for our children to learn.  This means looking at what we do, looking at how we think about what we do and improving what we do. In the posts to follow over the next few weeks, I will be posting information that will provide you with different ways of looking at what you do, how you teach and how children learn to read and write. This will include looking at literacy concepts (and possibly numeracy concepts as well), and looking at ways that we can understand everyday concept development in the home.  I will also provide some useful links to resources.

How to teach your child to read

It’s never too early to start reading books to your child. I started reading books to my daughter when she was around six months old. As a parent, you are your child’s first teacher. This can be very daunting when you realise this, but don’t be worried. Establishing a routine at bedtime that includes reading a book with your child is the easiest way you can start to do this. It will develop into a time that you will really treasure and look forward to.

How to Teach Reading

Sharing books is actually beginning reading. Children will listen to the story and begin to hear the sounds in words. Rhyme books are particularly  good for developing  phonological knowledge which is an important stage of learning to read. Your child will also be watching how you hold the book, how you turn the pages and all the early skills needed for reading. Not only is this an enjoyable time for you and your child, but it is also helping with their reading development.

What Good Readers Do

When trying to work out how to help your children when they are reading, it is always helpful to look at what good readers do. If you have a question about this topic, please post a comment and I’ll get back to you.