Tag Archives: Learning

How does the brain ‘see’ words?

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When learning to read, the brain has to learn to flip the words so that they appear right side up.

Developmental sequence in learning to read words

Method for learning and education.

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There are 4 levels that children progress through when learning to read words:

1. Linking spoken and written words – this is when children start to make the links between what they hear and what they see by  memorising certain parts of words, convert letters into a sound then a blend ie ‘sh’ or use the first part of the word together with meaning.

2. Recognising letter-groups and words – at this stage, children are beginning to learn how to actually recode a letter cluster as a sound pattern. This is when THRASS is a useful tool for students to use when working with words.

3. Reading words directly – Children at this stage are now reading words using their phonemic and orthographic knowledge. This is when they start to make analogies with words that they know. For example, if the unknown word is ‘lay’ they may remember the word ‘d + ay = day’ and use this word to help them problem solve the unknown word.

4. Reading words of two or more syllables – at this stage, children are now combining segments of words, manipulating stress patterns in words and recognising smaller words within words and base words.

How to teach my child to learn to read and write

We know that early childhood is important and what we do is critical in order for us to provide the best possible environment for our children to learn.  This means looking at what we do, looking at how we think about what we do and improving what we do. In the posts to follow over the next few weeks, I will be posting information that will provide you with different ways of looking at what you do, how you teach and how children learn to read and write. This will include looking at literacy concepts (and possibly numeracy concepts as well), and looking at ways that we can understand everyday concept development in the home.  I will also provide some useful links to resources.