Tag Archives: Child

How can professionals tell if someone has Aspergers?

Aspergers is sometimes difficult to diagnose as it can present with many other disorders such as:

 * Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder • Depressive Disorder • Dysthymia Disorder • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder • Seizure Disorder/Epilepsy • Sensory Integration Dysfunction • Tourette’s Syndrome The diagnosis is usually done by a Psychiatrist and is a very comprehensive assessment that involves looking at the history, behaviours, an interview with the parents, a psychological assessment and recommendations. If you would like more information, please click on the link below. http://www.myaspergerschild.com/2011/01/how-aspergers-is-diagnosed.html

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Autism and Aspergers

RakuKind

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Today, I thought I would post some very good ideas from Mark Hutton’s newsletter I subscribe to about children with Aspergers.

Today, I’d like to talk to you about some very simple – yet highly effective – parenting techniques for Aspergers children. There are many things you can do to help your child better understand the world, and in doing so, make everyone’s lives a little easier.

 

Remember, they are children just like the rest; they have their own personalities, abilities, likes and dislikes – they just need extra support, patience and understanding from everyone around them. Here are some simple – but very effective techniques:

• Begin early to teach the difference between private and public places and actions, so that they can develop ways of coping with more complex social rules later in life.
• Don’t always expect them to ‘act their age’ they are usually immature and you should make some allowances for this.
• Explain why they should look at you when you speak to them…. encourage them; give lots of praise for any achievement – especially when they use a social skill without prompting.
• Find a way of coping with behavior problems – perhaps trying to ignore it if it’s not too bad or hugging sometimes can help.
• In some young kids who appear not to listen – the act of ‘singing’ your words can have a beneficial effect.”

I will be posting more information on this topic about Autism and Aspergers, as I’m finding that in our schools, we are enrolling more children that are on this spectrum. Because of this, teachers, and parents, are needing more information and strategies to assist them when working with students with Aspergers and Autism.
 

 

Developmental sequence in learning to read words

Method for learning and education.

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There are 4 levels that children progress through when learning to read words:

1. Linking spoken and written words – this is when children start to make the links between what they hear and what they see by  memorising certain parts of words, convert letters into a sound then a blend ie ‘sh’ or use the first part of the word together with meaning.

2. Recognising letter-groups and words – at this stage, children are beginning to learn how to actually recode a letter cluster as a sound pattern. This is when THRASS is a useful tool for students to use when working with words.

3. Reading words directly – Children at this stage are now reading words using their phonemic and orthographic knowledge. This is when they start to make analogies with words that they know. For example, if the unknown word is ‘lay’ they may remember the word ‘d + ay = day’ and use this word to help them problem solve the unknown word.

4. Reading words of two or more syllables – at this stage, children are now combining segments of words, manipulating stress patterns in words and recognising smaller words within words and base words.

Bullying

Bullying UK

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I think that we have all had some experience with bullying at some stage. Whether it be with ourselves when we were little or with our own kids. It’s something that should be taken seriously and should not be tolerated in our society. Trinidad Hunt has a wonderful activity you could use with your class about how to choose friends. I’ve pasted it on my blog as I feel it would be such a wonderful activity for you to do with your own children or if you are a teacher, do it with your class. Perhaps it could provide some inspiration for us as adults to take a look at those friends who are ‘poisonous’ to us. Let me know what you think.

This is the classroom activity that I designed, you can do the same with your class:

  1. Divide the class into teams of 4 or 5.
  2. Hand each team a large sheet of butcher or poster paper and a set of poster pens.
  3. Ask each team to draw a line down the middle of the sheet.
  4. Title the left column: Fake Friends
  5. Title the right column: Real Friends
  6. Ask the students to list the things makes a Fake Friend or a Real Friend
  7. Give the teams 12-15 minutes to fill their charts in.
  8. Have each team share their charts.  Based on the following guidelines.
    • Everyone must share something.
    • One person introduces each member of the team.
    • One person shares the process they went through to complete their discussion and the chart.
    • Two or three students share the material.
    • One person ‘wraps’ or reviews and ties together the presentation to close.

Close with a full room discussion on recognizing the difference between fake friends and real friends in real life and surrounding yourself with real friends.

THRASS – helping children to read, write and spell

english language

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THRASS is a wonderful program designed to help children learn the 44 phonemes of the English language. It is particularly useful for second language learners of English. The THRASS Phoneme Machine is a FREE computer programme that uses moving human lips to pronounce the sounds (phonemes) in hundreds of frequently used English words. An excellent resource for teachers, assistants and parents. www.phonememachine.com

 

Literacy Learning

Shockingly diverse kindergarten group in Paris

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We can use lots of everyday objects and things in our environment to help our children learn to read. For example, when we are at the shops or the bank or wherever, you could do the following:  Mum says, ‘We have to push to open the door. Look! The sign says PUSH.’ In this way, you are focusing your child’s attention on to the word ‘PUSH’. This will help them as they begin to recognise symbols that are meaningful to them such as letters, the words for signs in their street or at the shops. Later, they will learn to recognise the word ‘PUSH’ in lots of different places and this is very important for literacy learning.

How to teach my child to learn to read and write

We know that early childhood is important and what we do is critical in order for us to provide the best possible environment for our children to learn.  This means looking at what we do, looking at how we think about what we do and improving what we do. In the posts to follow over the next few weeks, I will be posting information that will provide you with different ways of looking at what you do, how you teach and how children learn to read and write. This will include looking at literacy concepts (and possibly numeracy concepts as well), and looking at ways that we can understand everyday concept development in the home.  I will also provide some useful links to resources.

How to teach your child to read

It’s never too early to start reading books to your child. I started reading books to my daughter when she was around six months old. As a parent, you are your child’s first teacher. This can be very daunting when you realise this, but don’t be worried. Establishing a routine at bedtime that includes reading a book with your child is the easiest way you can start to do this. It will develop into a time that you will really treasure and look forward to.

How to Teach Reading

Sharing books is actually beginning reading. Children will listen to the story and begin to hear the sounds in words. Rhyme books are particularly  good for developing  phonological knowledge which is an important stage of learning to read. Your child will also be watching how you hold the book, how you turn the pages and all the early skills needed for reading. Not only is this an enjoyable time for you and your child, but it is also helping with their reading development.