Daily Archives: September 23, 2010

Autism and Aspergers

RakuKind

Image via Wikipedia

Today, I thought I would post some very good ideas from Mark Hutton’s newsletter I subscribe to about children with Aspergers.

Today, I’d like to talk to you about some very simple – yet highly effective – parenting techniques for Aspergers children. There are many things you can do to help your child better understand the world, and in doing so, make everyone’s lives a little easier.

 

Remember, they are children just like the rest; they have their own personalities, abilities, likes and dislikes – they just need extra support, patience and understanding from everyone around them. Here are some simple – but very effective techniques:

• Begin early to teach the difference between private and public places and actions, so that they can develop ways of coping with more complex social rules later in life.
• Don’t always expect them to ‘act their age’ they are usually immature and you should make some allowances for this.
• Explain why they should look at you when you speak to them…. encourage them; give lots of praise for any achievement – especially when they use a social skill without prompting.
• Find a way of coping with behavior problems – perhaps trying to ignore it if it’s not too bad or hugging sometimes can help.
• In some young kids who appear not to listen – the act of ‘singing’ your words can have a beneficial effect.”

I will be posting more information on this topic about Autism and Aspergers, as I’m finding that in our schools, we are enrolling more children that are on this spectrum. Because of this, teachers, and parents, are needing more information and strategies to assist them when working with students with Aspergers and Autism.
 

 

Developmental sequence in learning to read words

Method for learning and education.

Image via Wikipedia

There are 4 levels that children progress through when learning to read words:

1. Linking spoken and written words – this is when children start to make the links between what they hear and what they see by  memorising certain parts of words, convert letters into a sound then a blend ie ‘sh’ or use the first part of the word together with meaning.

2. Recognising letter-groups and words – at this stage, children are beginning to learn how to actually recode a letter cluster as a sound pattern. This is when THRASS is a useful tool for students to use when working with words.

3. Reading words directly – Children at this stage are now reading words using their phonemic and orthographic knowledge. This is when they start to make analogies with words that they know. For example, if the unknown word is ‘lay’ they may remember the word ‘d + ay = day’ and use this word to help them problem solve the unknown word.

4. Reading words of two or more syllables – at this stage, children are now combining segments of words, manipulating stress patterns in words and recognising smaller words within words and base words.